Activity Intolerance related to Pain of Dysmenorrhea

Nursing Diagnosis Activity Intolerance related to Pain of Dysmenorrhea

Nursing Care Plan for Dysmenorrhea : Nursing Diagnosis Activity Intolerance related to Pain

Dysmenorrhea is a gynecological medical condition of pain during menstruation that interferes with daily activities, as defined by ACOG and others.

There are two types of dysmenorrhea: "primary" and "secondary".

Primary dysmenorrhea is common menstrual cramps that are recurrent and are not due to other diseases. Cramps usually begin one to two years after a woman starts getting her period. Pain usually begins 1 or 2 days before or when menstrual bleeding starts and is felt in the lower abdomen, back, or thighs and can range from mild to severe. Pain can typically last 12 to 72 hours and can be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and even diarrhea. Common menstrual cramps usually become less painful as a woman ages and may stop entirely if the woman has a baby.

Secondary dysmenorrhea is pain that is caused by a disorder in the woman's reproductive organs, such as endometriosis, adenomyosis, uterine fibroids, or infection. Pain from secondary dysmenorrhea usually begins earlier in the menstrual cycle and lasts longer than common menstrual cramps. The pain is not typically accompanied by nausea, vomiting, fatigue, or diarrhea.

The main symptom of dysmenorrhea is pain concentrated in the lower abdomen, in the umbilical region or the suprapubic region of the abdomen. It is also commonly felt in the right or left abdomen. It may radiate to the thighs and lower back.

Symptoms often co-occurring with menstrual pain include nausea and vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, headache, dizziness, disorientation, hypersensitivity to sound, light, smell and touch, fainting, and fatigue. Symptoms of dysmenorrhea often begin immediately following ovulation and can last until the end of menstruation. This is because dysmenorrhea is often associated with changes in hormonal levels in the body that occur with ovulation. The use of certain types of birth control pills can prevent the symptoms of dysmenorrhea, because the birth control pills stop ovulation from occurring.

Nursing Care Plan for Dysmenorrhea 

Nursing Diagnosis Activity Intolerance related to Pain

Goal :

Showed improved activity tolerance

Expected outcomes: the patient can perform activities

Nursing Interventions :

1.Avoid frequent intervention is not important which can make tired, give adequate rest.
Rational : Adequate rest can reduce stress and increase comfort.

2. Provide adequate rest and sleep 8-10 hours each night.
Rational : Adequate rest and sleep enough to reduce fatigue and increase resistance to infection.

3. Provide adequate rest and sleep 8-10 hours each night.
Rational : Adequate rest and sleep enough to reduce fatigue and increase resistance to infection.

4. Observations over the level of pain, and motor response, 30 minutes after drug administration to assess the analgesic effectiveness. And every 1-2 hours after the maintenance action for 1-2 days.
Rational : The assessment will provide optimal nursing objective data to prevent possible complications and appropriate interventions.
ads

No comments:

Post a Comment